This Medicine Ball Abs Workout Will Fire Up Your Core In 10 Minutes

This Medicine Ball Abs Workout Will Fire Up Your Core In 10 Minutes

This Medicine Ball Abs Workout Will Fire Up Your Core In 10 Minutes

1

Deadbug Pullover

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Muscles worked: rectus abdominis, lats, hip flexors

Why it rocks: This is a classic anti-flexion exercise with an upper body twist that focuses on torso stability and limb coordination, which has many functional applications for other exercises (such as squatting, where the torso is required to stabilize while the legs and hip joints are moving).

How to:

  1. Start by laying on back on the floor, holding the medicine ball above chest with straight arms. Option to extend legs toward the ceiling or bend at knees into tabletop.
  2. Without moving the torso, simultaneously reach both arms and legs away from each other until you achieve a hollow body hold. (Keep knees bent throughout, if modifying.)
  3. Pull both arms and legs back to center to return to the starting position. That’s 1 rep. Complete AMRAP for 30 seconds.

Pro tip: Only pursue a range of motion that allows you to keep the torso still and stable. If your back arches at anytime, limit how far you reach arms and legs.

2

Situp To Overhead Press

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Muscles worked: rectus abdominis, hip flexors, pecs

Why it rocks: The medicine ball helps generate momentum to assist with the act of sitting up and to power up this classic abs exercise.

How to:

  1. Start by laying on back on mat with feet planted and knees bent.
  2. Hold the medicine ball with both hands and resting on chest with elbows folded in neatly on either side.
  3. Keeping the hips and feet planted on the floor, rock into a seated position while simultaneously pressing the medicine ball overhead.
  4. Reverse the motion to lower back to the starting position on the mat. That’s 1 rep. Complete AMRAP for 30 seconds.

Trainer tip: Have a yoga mat, folded towel, or cushion on standby to place underneath you for support if you feel discomfort in your tailbone.

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3

Seated Rotation To Svend Press

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Muscles worked: transverse abdominis, obliques, rectus abdominis, pecs

Why it rocks: The Svend press works on anti-rotational core stability. This is helpful for a dancer doing pirouettes or a gym-goer warming up with side planks.

How to:

  1. Start seated on the floor with knees bent and feet planted, holding the medicine ball in front of your chest with the elbows folded in neatly on either side of the body.
  2. Staying seated and keeping the medicine ball on your chest, lean torso backwards then rotate the shoulders to one side.
  3. Maintaining the rotated position, press the medicine ball away from the chest until arms are extended.
  4. Bring the medicine ball back to your chest with elbows hugged close.
  5. Rotate to the opposite side and repeat steps three and four. That’s 1 rep. Complete AMRAP for 30 seconds.

Trainer tip: Make sure you are pressing the medicine ball forward directly in front of your sternum to maintain proper shoulder alignment.

4

Seated Leg Raise

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Muscles worked: rectus abdominis, hip flexors, quads, adductors

Why it rocks: It is important to actively train your hip flexors to combat all those hours seated in passive hip flexion, which can lead to weak and unstable hips and potentially lower back injury.

How to:

  1. Start seated on the floor with knees bent, legs together, and heels resting lightly on the floor.
  2. Place the medicine ball on right side of ankles, and press palms on the floor behind you with the arms bent for support.
  3. Lift the legs to the right up and over the medicine ball to tap the heels lightly on the other side.
  4. Lift the legs over the medicine ball to the left to return back to the starting position. That’s 1 rep. Complete AMRAP for 30 seconds.

Trainer tip: This is one of the more challenging exercises in this workout. To modify, bring the medicine ball closer to the base of your hips and keep the movement small.

5

Fireman Get-up (Left)

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Muscles worked: transverse abdominis, obliques

Why it rocks: This functional get-up variation is inspired by the Ranger Roll. It includes a rolling pattern instead of a flexion, which is a skill that’s especially helpful as you get older to get up safely.

How to:

  1. Start by laying on back on the floor. Bend the left knee so that the left foot is firmly planted on the floor. Extend the right leg on the floor at a diagonal wider than hip-width apart.
  2. Cradle the medicine ball in the left arm will so that it rests on chest and extend right arm on the floor at a diagonal (to find the exact placement, place right hand on hip before fully extending the right arm). This is the starting position.
  3. Keeping right forearm firmly planted on the floor, use a rolling momentum to lift torso off the floor and up onto right elbow, as if you are performing a side plank. (Note that you will be balanced between right forearm, right hip, and left foot, and hugging the medicine ball to chest with left arm.)
  4. Reverse the movement by pushing and rolling away from the right leg, returning to the floor in the starting position. That’s 1 rep. Complete AMRAP for 30 seconds.

Trainer tip: Imagine that you are rolling over to hit snooze on your alarm.

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6

Fireman Get-up (Right)

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How to:

  1. Start by laying on back on the floor. Bend the right knee so that the right foot is firmly planted on the floor. Extend the left leg on the floor at a diagonal wider than hip-width apart.
  2. Cradle the medicine ball in the right arm will so that it rests on chest and extend left arm on the floor at a diagonal (to find the exact placement, place left hand on hip before fully extending the left arm). This is the starting position (mirroring the exercise shown).
  3. Keeping left forearm firmly planted on the floor, use a rolling momentum to lift torso off the floor and up onto left elbow, as if you are performing a side plank. (Note that you will be balanced between left forearm, left hip, and right foot, and hugging the medicine ball to chest with right arm.)
  4. Reverse the movement by pushing and rolling away from the left leg, returning to the floor in the starting position. That’s 1 rep. Complete AMRAP for 30 seconds.
7

Russian Twist

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Muscles worked: transverse abdominis, obliques, rectus abdominis

Why it rocks: The oscillating nature of this exercise is what stimulates your core and generates power. It can benefit a variety of sports that feature rotational core strength, such as golf, baseball, and boxing.

How to:

  1. Start seated on the floor with knees bent and feet planted on the floor. Bear hug the medicine ball tight to chest and lean torso backwards.
  2. Twist the shoulders from side to side at a consistent moderate-to-rapid pace, keeping legs stable and medicine ball secure. Continue rotating side to side for 60 seconds.

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Jennifer Nied is the fitness editor at Women’s Health and has more than 10 years of experience in health and wellness journalism. She’s always out exploring—sweat-testing workouts and gear, hiking, snowboarding, running, and more—with her husband, daughter, and dog.